ABC Melbourne - Drive with Warwick Long - Transcript

E&OE TRANSCRIPT
RADIO INTERVIEW
ABC MELBOURNE – DRIVE WITH WARWICK LONG
THURSDAY, 4 APRIL 2024

SUBJECTS: Non-compete clauses

WARWICK LONG (HOST): Dr Andrew Leigh is the Assistant Minister for Competition. Welcome to the program.

ANDREW LEIGH: Thanks, Warwick. Great to be with you and your listeners.

LONG: Why are non compete clauses bad for productivity?

LEIGH: Well, the biggest wage gains over a worker's career, Warwick, come when they switch jobs. If you look at job switches, they tend to get a significant pay bump, several thousand dollars on average. And we've seen the job switching rate falling over recent decades. One reason for that may be that a lot of employees have a clause in their employment agreement that says that they can't easily move to a competitor. They might be constrained to a particular geography in a particular time period. So, for example, you can't take another job in Melbourne for the next six months. And that means that workers miss out on the potential wage gains of shifting jobs. It also potentially means that a start up company can't hire the staff it needs in order to take on the incumbents. And that's why we've launched today this issues paper which is asking people to let us know their views on non compete clauses, whether they ought to be reformed, what ought to be the next steps.

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ABC Radio Perth - Mornings with Nadia Mitsopoulos - Transcript

E&OE TRANSCRIPT
PODCAST INTERVIEW
ABC RADIO PERTH - MORNINGS WITH NADIA MITSOPOULOS
THURSDAY, 4 APRIL 2024

SUBJECTS: Non-compete clauses

NADIA MITSOPOULOS (HOST): Now, I wonder if you've ever left a job and then found yourself subject to a non compete clause which prevented you from working for a competitor. Now, if you have, I'd like to hear about your experience. And did you think it was fair or did you feel like you had a choice? Dr Andrew Leigh is the Assistant Minister for Treasury. I spoke to him earlier this morning about this and I started by asking him how widespread non compete clauses are.

ANDREW LEIGH: It looks like about one in five workers in the Australian workforce are subject to a non compete clause. We've got that number two ways: we’ve done surveys of employees and of employers. Part of what we want to do in this exercise is to gather the data. Over the course of the last year, we've discovered that non compete clauses aren't just being applied to executives, but also to early childhood workers, yoga instructors, dance teachers, security guards and hairdressers. And the impact of them could well be to dampen wage growth as well as to reduce productivity.

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The Conversation - Politics with Michelle Grattan - Transcript

E&OE TRANSCRIPT
PODCAST INTERVIEW
THE CONVERSATION – POLITICS WITH MICHELLE GRATTAN
THURSDAY, 4 APRIL 2024

SUBJECTS: Non-compete clauses, restraint of trade, no-poach agreements, competition reform

MICHELLE GRATTAN, HOST: The Albanese Government and the Australian public are at present highly focused on the immediate cost of living crisis, the implications of it and the ways to deal with it. But the longer-term economic story is all about the fundamental reforms that are needed. And one of these is finding ways to make the Australian economy more competitive.

There are calls for change from business and other stakeholders and from economists. But, like most areas of reform, boosting competition is a challenging task because while there are winners, there are also losers, and they have loud voices.

A Minister at the forefront of this debate is Dr Andrew Leigh. He is the Assistant Minister for Competition, Charities, Treasury and Assistant Minister for Employment. In a speech he'll deliver on Thursday, Andrew Leigh outlines the need to rethink current provisions under which people who leave their jobs can be banned from competing with their former employer, whether that's for a certain period of time, or in a particular geographic area, or even both.

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Unshackling Innovation: Rethinking non-compete clauses for a dynamic economy - Speech

ADDRESS TO THE MCKELL INSTITUTE

THURSDAY, 4 APRIL 2024

Non-compete clauses

As the Economist points out, when it comes to non-compete clauses ‘The clue is in the name’ (The Economist 2023). Non-compete clauses restrict an employee from working for a competitor or setting up a competing business when they leave. Non-compete clauses typically apply for a certain time, in a set geographic location, and within a defined industry. Let me provide some real examples to get things started.

Breakdancing

‘Charlotte’, a 17-year-old landed her first casual job as a dance teacher. It was her dream job, but it wasn’t perfect. Far from it – Charlotte was forced to quit after experiencing harassment.  Months later, she took a job at a different dance studio and immediately received a warning letter from her former employer. The letter said Charlotte had breached a restraint of trade clause to not work or volunteer for a competing business for 36-months within a 15-kilometre exclusion zone – noting the company had several studios. Putting her in a difficult position, Charlotte’s former employer also contacted the new dance studio.

Client disservice

‘Mia’, a disability support worker was doing what she loves – working in the community and helping people. She developed trust and rapport with her clients over many years.

Mia worked for a registered National Disability Insurance Scheme provider but wasn’t too happy about being offered a new contract with a lower hourly rate. So Mia went out on her own as an independent and later joined a rival registered provider. Without any cajoling, several former clients decided to transfer their care plans and follow her to the new provider. Mia received a letter from her former employer stating that she had breached restraint of trade clauses relating to non-competition and non-solicitation of clients.

Unbending

Patrick, a 21-year-old boilermaker, built a solid resumé and decided it was time to take his skills and pay packet to the next level. His new opportunity involved not working for a competitor but working in-house for a former client. It was a rural town and customers were hard to find so Patrick’s previous employer wasn’t pleased about losing a client.

Patrick was branded a troublemaker and was sent a letter saying he breached his post-employment obligations. The letter further applied the blowtorch by threatening court action seeking thousands of dollars in damages plus costs.

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Consultation on non-compete clauses and other worker restraints - Media Release

The Government is today releasing an issues paper on non‑compete and related restraint clauses that seeks feedback from workers, businesses and the broader community on the use and impact of these clauses across the economy.

Surveys of employers and employees suggest that around 1 in 5 workers are subject to a non-compete clause hampering their ability to move to a better job. Non-compete clauses have been found to apply not only to senior executives, but to many low-wage workers, including boilermakers, hairdressers, early childhood workers and yoga instructors.

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Building the data to help investors direct their money and shape the world - Opinion Piece

Consumers and investors have long understood that what they buy, and the investment decisions they make, have the power to influence social, economic, and environmental challenges. As far back as the 1700s, John Wesley advised his congregants against "any sinful trade". When the Methodist Church began investing in the stock market at the turn of the 20th century, it avoided companies involved in alcohol and gambling. When investors saw the destruction of the Vietnam War in the 1970s, they created the first ethical fund - the Pax World Fund - so they could avoid investing in weapons and weapons manufacturers.

Meanwhile, debate has raged about what this all means for corporations, and how they balance their responsibilities to shareholders and to the public. It's vital to create a financial system in which Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) factors into shareholder value, as much as acquisitions or sales. Without transparency and robust public reporting, how will we know about the ESG factors faced by a company, and make decisions about where to invest our dollars accordingly?

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The man who discovered people hate losing more than they like winning - Opinion Piece

Daniel Kahneman (1934-2024) was teaching air force flight instructors when one of them informed him that criticism worked better than praise.

Whenever they praised a successful performance, the instructor noted, the cadet pilot tended to get worse. By contrast, when instructors screamed at a pilot for a poor performance, the cadet generally improved.

Kahneman realised that the instructors were reacting to what statisticians call “regression to the mean”. Because performances are a function of both luck and skill, a lousy execution is typically followed by an improvement, while a great execution is typically followed by a deterioration.

But rather than turning the flight class into a maths lecture, Kahneman decided to illustrate the point by a simple exercise. He asked everyone to toss a coin over their shoulder towards a target. After the first attempt, people were ranked in their performance. They then tried again. As regression to the mean would predict, the best performers got worse, while the worst performers got better.

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ABC RN Breakfast with Sally Sara Monday 1 April - Transcript

E&OE TRANSCRIPT
RADIO INTERVIEW
ABC RN BREAKFAST WITH SALLY SARA
MONDAY, 1 APRIL 2024

SUBJECTS: Divestiture powers for competition regulators, the government’s work to improve supermarket competition, Meta removing news, News Media Bargaining Code, misinformation and disinformation.

SALLY SARA, HOST: The Greens and Coalition are working separately on powers that could forcibly break up the major supermarkets, although the government isn’t backing that idea just yet. Andrew Leigh is the Assistant Minister for Competition and Treasury, and joins me now, Andrew Leigh welcome back to the program.

ANDREW LEIGH: Thanks Sally, great to be with you and your listeners.

SARA: If the ACCC recommended divestiture for the big supermarkets would you consider it or is it completely off the table?

LEIGH: Well let’s see what the ACCC come back with, but it’s certainly true Sally if you look at previous competition inquiries, the Hilmer Review didn’t recommend divestiture, the Harper Review didn’t recommend divestiture. Daniel Mulino’s House Economics Committee has just brought down a terrific 280-page report on competition, it doesn’t recommend divestiture, and that includes the Coalition members of that committee. The National Farmers Federation have argued against divestiture, and the ACTU have made the point that it could potentially hurt workers. So we’re sceptical, but of course we’ll always look to advice from agencies and we’re looking eagerly to see what the ACCC comes back with in their supermarkets inquiry.

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Harnessing The Data Deluge: The Surprising Power Of Big Data And Artificial Intelligence - Speech

SPEECH

HARNESSING THE DATA DELUGE: THE SURPRISING POWER OF BIG DATA AND ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE*

ADDRESS TO THE 10TH ANNUAL AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT DATA SUMMIT
HOTEL REALM, CANBERRA
THURSDAY, 28 MARCH 2024

I acknowledge the Ngunnawal people, the traditional owners of these lands, and pay respects to all First Nations people present.

I’m pleased to join you today, in the tenth year of the annual Australian Government Data Summit. Robust, rigorous data and statistics are vital for delivering outcomes for all Australians.

Throughout our nation’s history, Australia’s statisticians and statistical agencies have punched above their weight in this – or should I say, found themselves in the right tail of the distribution. The nation’s first statistician, George Knibbs (known to his friends as ‘The Knibb’) published papers on mathematics, geodesy, wealth, and population. He was an acting professor of physics at the University of Sydney. He published a book on the federal capital. He was a member of the British Astronomical Society. He even wrote a book of verse.

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Parliament Passes Labor’s Designated Complaints Measure – Consultations Now Open On Further Details - Joint Media Release

Joint media release with
Julie Collins MP
Minister for Small Business

PARLIAMENT PASSES LABOR’S DESIGNATED COMPLAINTS MEASURE – CONSULTATIONS NOW OPEN ON FURTHER DETAILS

Yesterday the Parliament passed the Competition and Consumer Amendment (Fair Go for Consumers and Small Business) Bill 2024. This reform, which forms part of the Albanese Government’s Better Competition election commitment, establishes a designated complaints function within the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) from July 2024.

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Cnr Gungahlin Pl and Efkarpidis Street, Gungahlin ACT 2912 | 02 6247 4396 | [email protected] | Authorised by A. Leigh MP, Australian Labor Party (ACT Branch), Canberra.