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This is not a first home saver account, this is your superannuation account - Transcript, Lateline

E&OE TRANSCRIPT

TV INTERVIEW

ABC LATELINE

FRIDAY, 12 MAY 2017

 

SUBJECT/S: Labor’s Budget reply, 2017 Federal Budget for millionaires and multinationals, Superannuation raid for housing deposit, Medicare levy, Drug testing for welfare recipients

DAVID LIPSON, PRESENTER: Angus Taylor, Andrew Leigh, welcome to Lateline. Andrew Leigh, I want to start with you. Something you had to say on morning radio with Dan Bourchier of ABC Canberra about the government's housing affordability plan. You said it was a raid on superannuation of young people. Can you explain that?

ANDREW LEIGH, SHADOW ASSISTANT TREASURER: David, our superannuation system ought to have one purpose, which is to ensure the security of people's retirement. It shouldn't be raided in order to support the buying of first home buyers.

LIPSON: How is it a raid if it’s money that’s going in over and above compulsory super contributions?

LEIGH: There ought to be one purpose for superannuation, David. This is raiding people's superannuation accounts in a manner that Malcolm Turnbull last year said was "a thoroughly bad idea".

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Labor's Tax Transparency Measures Among the Strongest in the World - Transcript, SKY AM Agenda

E&OE TRANSCRIPT

TV INTERVIEW

SKY AM AGENDA

FRIDAY, 12 MAY 2017

SUBJECT/S: Labor’s Budget reply, 2017 Federal Budget for millionaires and multinationals, Medicare levy


KIERAN GILBERT, PRESENTER: 
Joining me on the program now is the program now is the Shadow Assistant Treasurer Andrew Leigh. Andrew Leigh, thanks for your time. First of all on the deficit levy, let's start with that, has Labor given up on aspirational voters with that move?

ANDREW LEIGH, SHADOW ASSISTANT TREASURER: Kieran, this is a levy which is basically paid for by the top 1 per cent. Ninety-four per cent of the revenue comes from the top 1 per cent of Australians, a group that has doubled their share of national income over the last generation. We believe that they ought not to be the only people in Australia who are getting a tax cut. Let's take an example of a bank CEO. A bank CEO would get a $170,000 tax cut as a result of Malcolm Turnbull's decisions. Meanwhile, someone working on the Sunday the 2nd of July, the day after the bank CEO begins to get their tax cut, they get $77 less from the cut to penalty rates...

GILBERT: The numbers have been repeatedly raised by both sides over the years, but Deloitte Access Economics analysis shows that the top few per cent, the top 3 per cent, contribute well over 20 per cent of the tax revenue. It's a huge contribution they make already that they make.

LEIGH: And they have well over their proportionate share of income, Kieran. It's exactly what you would expect even if we only had flat tax rates. But we have progressive tax rates for a reason which is that if you are on a multi-million dollar salary you can afford to pay a bit more.

GILBERT: But what about a person on $180,000 living in Sydney?

LEIGH: They don't benefit from Malcolm Turnbull's tax cut. It's people earning over $180,000.

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The Government's proposal is to jack up taxes on all working Australians - Transcript, ABC News Breakfast

E&OE TRANSCRIPT

TV INTERVIEW

ABC NEWS BREAKFAST

FRIDAY, 12 MAY 2017

SUBJECT/S: Labor’s Budget reply, 2017 Federal Budget for millionaires and multinationals, Medicare levy

MICHAEL ROWLAND, PRESENTER: Shadow Assistant Treasurer Andrew Leigh joins us from Parliament House in Canberra now. Andrew Leigh, good morning to you.

ANDREW LEIGH, SHADOW ASSISTANT TREASURER: Good morning, Michael.

ROWLAND: Why have you decided to support that rise in the Medicare levy to fund the NDIS in part and only make higher income earners pay it?

LEIGH: Michael, our approach is always to be as constructive as possible, and in this instance we have decided that four out of five taxpayers shouldn't be paying the increased Medicare levy. The NDIS was fully funded. Let's not let that lie slide. When Labor put it in place, we put it in place along with a series of savings and a very clear plan to pay for it. The Government's proposal is to jack up taxes on all working Australians. Labor would shield four out of five workers from that increase in the Medicare levy.

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The budget doesn't do anything to improve housing affordability - Transcript, CNBC Squawk Box

E&OE TRANSCRIPT

TV INTERVIEW

CNBC SQUAWK BOX

WEDNESDAY, 10 MAY 2017

SUBJECT/S: 2017 Federal Budget.

MATT TAYLOR: Andrew Leigh, thank you very much for chatting with us. What did you make of the budget that was revealed last night? By some it has been called a Labor lite budget, is that how you see the budget?

ANDREW LEIGH, SHADOW ASSISTANT TREASURER: I think if you're assessing any budget you need to do it based on the challenges that Australia faces. We've got rising inequality, declining home ownership and sluggish productivity. My worry is that the budget has a huge tax hand out for millionaires, some $16,400. But the budget doesn't do anything to improve housing affordability by tackling negative gearing and capital gains tax discount which have acted together to blow up the housing market and drive home ownership to it's lowest level in 60 years. We don't have the infrastructure spend on things like the National Broadband Network or the education spend that we need in order to build prosperity for the future. 

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It is not the right time to be giving a huge tax cut to the big end of town - Transcript, ABC Newsradio

E&OE TRANSCRIPT

RADIO INTERVIEW

ABC NEWSRADIO

WEDNESDAY, 10 MAY 2017

SUBJECT/S: Turnbull’s budget for millionaires and multinationals, housing affordability, bank levy, Medicare levy, low wage growth under Malcolm Turnbull

[AUDIO CUTS IN]

ANDREW LEIGH, SHADOW ASSISTANT TREASURER: This is a Budget that delivers very little to economic growth, but a huge amount to the pockets of these shareholders of some of  the world's biggest firms. It's a Budget which is taking money out of Australian schools, which is taking money out of our universities, at a time when we know, Glen, if we want to be a prosperous, equitable, productive nation, we have to be investing first and foremost in education. Yet our schools, are saying they are going to have to raise fees. Universities may have to going to have to lay off researchers as a result of these cuts to those institutions.

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The banking levy is an extraordinary exercise in chutzpah - Transcript, FiveAA

E&OE TRANSCRIPT

RADIO INTERVIEW

FIVEAA MORNINGS

WEDNESDAY, 10 MAY 2017

SUBJECT/S: 2017 Federal Budget.

LEON BYNER: The Shadow Assistant Treasurer is Dr Andrew Leigh. Andrew first of all, I'll pick out a couple of things. What do you think of the $6.2 billion taken off banks to fund the NDIS?

ANDREW LEIGH, SHADOW ASSISTANT TREASURER: G'day Leon and good morning to you and your listeners. The banking levy is an extraordinary exercise in chutzpah. I’m old enough to remember just a few years back when Chris Bowen put a banking levy on which was just a tenth of the size of this one. And with the revenue hypothecated towards a special financial stability fund rather than just put into general revenue. This is a very significant levy for the banks and for the Government – as on a bunch of other things – has done a complete backflip.

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Budget Tinkers with Competition Penalties, Won't Go All the Way - Media Release

BUDGET TINKERS WITH COMPETITION PENALTIES, WON’T GO ALL THE WAY

Labor welcomes the Government’s adoption of Labor’s plan to increase the penalties for anti-consumer conduct under the Australian Consumer Law from $1.1 million to $10 million. Labor took this policy to the 2016 election. On dozens of occasions since, we have invited the Coalition to adopt it. Finally, they have done so.

But the Turnbull Government has failed to increase penalties for anti-competitive conduct and to double the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission’s litigation budget so that it can take more enforcement action.

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Scomo on Multinational Tax: More Revlon than Revolution - Media Release

SCOMO ON MULTINATIONAL TAX: MORE REVLON THAN REVOLUTION

For all Scott Morrison’s rhetoric about tax avoidance, tonight’s multinational tax measures are simply cosmetic.

According to the government’s own budget papers, their revenue gain is ‘unquantifiable’. 

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The Government's Housing Plan is a Sham - Transcript, Sky News To The Point

E&OE TRANSCRIPT

TV INTERVIEW

SKY NEWS TO THE POINT

MONDAY, 8 MAY 2017

SUBJECT/S: Federal budget, housing affordability, Government inaction on negative gearing / Capital Gains Tax discount, corporate tax cuts rates for banks, Government’s $22 billion in cuts to schools, Eliud Kipchoge

KRISTINA KENEALLY, PRESENTER: Let's bring in our guest today, Shadow Assistant Treasurer Andrew Leigh. Joining us, not out of Perth, but Canberra. Great to see you.

ANDREW LEIGH, SHADOW ASSISTANT TREASURER: Thanks Kristina, great to be with you. G'day Peter

PETER VAN ONSELEN, PRESENTER: G'day, what do you think of Sam Dastyari not getting the approval of residents whose houses in some cases he mocked, in others he made legitimate statements about. What do you think of him rabbiting on about housing affordability when he himself has an investment property in Sydney, taking advantage of all of those perks of negative gearing.

LEIGH: Peter, I think young Australians are less worried about four-letter words and more worried about seven-digit house prices. These rapid house price rises we've seen over the last few years have been well in excess of what wages have been doing, driving houses out of the affordability range for so many young people. They come up to me at my street stalls - a young couple the other month, a builder and a teacher, saying they thought they were there in the market and then the prices just accelerated away from them. Why are they doing that?

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OpEd - Why the 1% Think They're the 99% - Business Insider

WHY THE 1% THINK THEY'RE THE BOTTOM 99%

Business Insider, 3 May 2017

Reducing economic inequality means addressing the widening social gap in Australia. New research shows that the income gaps within our cities have grown larger since the 1990s. Compared with two decades ago, well-paid workers are less likely to live in places with low average incomes. University of New South Wales economist Bruce Bradbury, who carried out the study, sums up his findings with the old joke: ‘What did the rich man say to the poor man? Nothing, they never met.’

A major risk of social bifurcation is that policymakers and commentators become disconnected from the reality of lived experience in Australia. Looking out from the boardroom, the parliament or the newsroom, it’s easy to forget that half of all households have disposable incomes below $80,000.

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