Labor's Plan for the Sharing Economy in Inner Sydney

LABOR’S PLAN FOR THE SHARING ECONOMY IN INNER SYDNEY

 17 February 2016

Deputy Leader of the Opposition Tanya Plibersek and Shadow Assistant Treasurer Andrew Leigh today visited local start-ups to talk about Labor’s positive plan for cities and the sharing economy.

Meeting with Sydney start-ups SheSays and Maker’s Place, they discussed innovation and how important it is to create a fair and flexible framework of rules for emerging sharing economy services to ensure all Australians can share in the benefits. 

The sharing economy is changing the way we buy and sell things. It is also changing how we think about work and the line between private property and public goods.

Australians are clearly embracing these services, with around one in 200 Australian homes now listed on Airbnb. Sharing models are responding to issues faced by our cities today, like congestion and community building.

That’s why Labor has announced a set of National Sharing Economy Principles and indicated we will work with state and territory governments to turn these into concrete rules and regulations.

Labor’s principles are:

1. Primary property is yours to share

When Australians use their own cars, homes or goods to deliver services, rules and regulations specific to the sharing economy should apply.

2. New services must support good wages and working conditions

When offering services which involve human labour, sharing economy companies should ensure their pricing and contracting arrangements allow Australians to achieve work outcomes at least equivalent to the prevailing industry standard.  

3. Everyone pays their fair share of tax

Everyone doing business in the sharing economy must pay a fair share of tax.

4. Proper protection for public safety

Sharing economy services must have the right insurance to protect Australians if anything goes wrong. Consumers should also be protected by the Australian Consumer Law and light-touch licencing and inspection rules at the state government level. 

5. Access for all

Sharing economy services should be accessible to Australians with disabilities. Sharing economy companies should negotiate service levels and needs through accessibility agreements with disability peak bodies.

6. Playing by the rules

Once tailored, light-touch rules exist for the sharing economy, there should be zero tolerance for companies that continue to flout Australian laws.

“Sharing economy services that make Australian cities more liveable and connected will benefit communities like ours,” said Deputy Leader of the Opposition Tanya Plibersek.

“But for new services to be born and flourish here in Australia, we need a fair and flexible set of rules which encourage innovation.”

Shadow Assistant Treasurer Andrew Leigh said: “There is huge economic and community potential in this emerging peer-to-peer market.

“Labor believes we should embrace it, while making sure we put the right rules in place to protect workers, consumers and the public good.”

 

WEDNESDAY, 17 FEBRUARY 2016

MEDIA CONTACTS: DAN DORAN 0427 464 350 (PLIBERSEK)

JENNIFER RAYNER 0428 214 856 (LEIGH)


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